Can Do Nothing For Her

Found December 1876, Greenses, Berwick.

In a tin box, a letter:

Schooner Regina, of Jersey, 21st December:
To whoever may find it.
H.P. Erith, Fair View Place, Gorey, Jersey.
4 p.m. – Blowing a fearful gale, sea terrible, hourly expecting to go on shore. Can do nothing for her. Tried to sail several times. She won’t bear it. Have told crew what to expect from her. God grant wind may veer in time to save us. Soundings in 27 fathoms rock, so now there is no chance. Expect to go ashore between Ferns and Coquet. No chance of saving life with this sea. Should like to see something. Weather thick. Have been lying-to two days. Have done all I can to keep her off, but can’t carry canvas. Praying that the Lord may have mercy on our souls and take us to heaven.
W. McReddy.
Tell my dear sisters I am thinking and praying for them.

Coquet is an island off Amble on the Northumberland coast, around 60 miles south of Berwick.

[Bradford Daily Telegraph, 1 January 1877]

Get the Messages from the Sea book

Captain and First Mate Overboard

Found October 1897, HM Dockyard, Portsmouth.

In a bottle, on a piece of paper:

September 8th, ’79, Brig Belfast.
Mutiny on board the Belfast. Captain and first mate overboard.
Lat. 41.29 south, lon. 32.26.

HM Dockyard, or Her Majesty’s Naval Base, is the Royal Navy base at Portsmouth.

[Glasgow Evening Citizen, 6 October 1879]

Get the Messages from the Sea book

No Sight of Land

Found April 1890, on Blatchington Beach, near Newhaven.

In a bottle, a letter:

Brig Elfrida, Captain Jones, left Glasgow April 12th, 1890.
Saturday, 19th, all sinking, no sight of land.
TOM SMITH, 40, Fellgate, Edinburgh.
Good Bye.

Elfrida was the first crowned Queen of England, as the wife of Anglo-Saxon King Edgar. There is no further record of the brig named after her.

[Braford Daily Telegraph, 26 April 1890]

Get the Messages from the Sea book

All the Boys Merry

Found 5 November 1914, Brightstone, Isle of Wight.

In a bottle, on two sides of a piece of paper:

Sunday, September 10th.
From some boys of the Warwicks off for the final at Berlin. Signed T.H. Rafferty, J.H. Scott, S. Rollins, S.W. Owen, T.C.L. Rosser, T. Hubball, and B. Rawlins.
All the boys merry under strenuous conditions. Hope the finder is O.K. Write to wife and baby.
Mrs Rafferty, 8, Hailliley Street, Handsworth.

The 1st Battalion of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment sailed from Southampton to Boulogne on board the SS Caledonia on 22 September 1914. Thomas Henry Rafferty, the writer of this message, was a tramway worker from Handsworth, Birmingham. He was married with a daughter. He was killed in action at Ypres on 25 April 1915. His body was never found.

[Birmingham Mail, 21 November 1914]

Get the Messages from the Sea book

Sea Messenger

Found 25 November 1870, on the coast near Penzance, Cornwall.

In an airtight metal case with a boat-like bottom and a metal flag mounted on top:

Schooner Yacht Cambria, Nov. 26, 6.30 p.m., 1870, in lat. 49 18 N, long. 7 82 W.
Dear Sir,
We launched a ‘sea messenger’ to the deep with this enclosed. We have just finished taking third reefs in foresail and mainsail, as there is every appearance of a dirty night, but glad to say we have a fair wind—rather a new thing for us to have this passage. We had 15 days’ strong easterly winds, with high seas, from the 3rd to the 18th inst. We passed to-day, at 3.30 p.m., the American ship Enoch Talbot, bound up channel. There is every appearance now of strong westerly winds. We are going ten knots.
Yours truly,
R.S. TANNOCK, Master.

This was one of six messages contained in the “sea messenger”, launched from the Cambria as an experiment to test the new invention. Painted on the front of the metal case were instructions for it to be delivered to the nearest Lloyd’s agency, where an agent would open the case and forward the letters to their respective addresses. The case was duly delivered to Messrs Mathews, the Lloyd’s agents for Penzance, and this letter was forwarded to the address of a newspaper correspondent in Portsmouth.

“This ‘sea messenger’ is the invention of Mr Julius Vanderbergh, of Southsea, as a means of preserving papers, &c., from a ship lost, or in imminent danger of being lost, at sea,” explained the Chelsea News and General Advertiser. “If not seen and picked up by some passing vessel, the messenger will be almost certain eventually to drive on the land, and may thus convey ashore the tale of some helpless ship, whose loss, with all on board, could by no other means be learnt.” The newspaper said that the sea messenger’s capture near Penzance, and the subsequent delivery of its letters, was “evidence of perfect success”.

[Chelsea News and General Advertiser, 3 December 1870]

Get the Messages from the Sea book